Music Festivals vs. American Cities

By: Ellie Doh
Illustration by Samira Idroos
Illustration by Samira Idroos
  TAGS:   Article, Exclusive, Festival

It feels like music festivals are taking over the world. Ten years ago festivals garnered smaller crowds and weren’t the massive celebrity hotbeds they’ve become today. Now there are week-long festivals with their own identities, atmospheres, land masses and tacit figureheads. The Flaming Lips are like unofficial spokespeople for Bonnaroo, not to mention Beyoncé and Nicki’s show of love for the Coachella in “Feeling Myself.” Major festivals boast specialized wristbands for entrance, iPhone apps for scheduling set lists, hi-tech camping set ups, art installations, food trucks, and even full-fledged restaurants. The experience of the modern day music festival is like visiting a colorfully decorated, music-fueled city of its own. We broke down how the biggest festivals in the U.S. measure up to real American cities and their major landmarks. Check it out below.

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Coachella vs. the Desert

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Coachella brings in over 600,000 people over the course of two weekends. The city of Indio in Palm Springs, CA, usually hosts a population of 50,000. That means Coachella brings over 10 times the local population of neon-clad music lovers to the California desert every year. Talk about kicking up some extra sand.

Staying Hydrated at Sasquatch! vs. the Water in Rick Ross’ Atlanta Pool

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Illustration by Samira Idroos

 

Staying hydrated at festivals is crucial. Sasquatch! Music Festival brings in over twice the capacity of The Gorge Amphitheatre in Washington state where it’s held. With roughly 50,000 people consuming about a gallon of water a day, over 200,000 gallons of water are consumed over four days of partying. Rick Ross has one of the largest and most famous swimming pools in the country, with well over 300,000 gallons of water to throw Rozay-style pool parties in. It’s an essential part of his mansion just outside Atlanta, Georgia. The amount of water consumed at Sasquatch! every day could fill a third of Rick Ross’ pool. By the end of the fest it would overflow. Wavy.

Lollapalooza vs. Pittsburgh

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Perry Farrell of Jane’s Addiction came up with Lollapalooza in 1991 to serve as a farewell tour for his band. Lolla has been bringing music lovers of all genres together for 15 years as one of the biggest and most prominent festivals in America. With over 300,000 festival-goers it’s gotten so big that the festival is basically the same size as Pittsburgh.

EDC Crowds vs. Times Square Crowds

Illustration by Samira Idroos

Illustration by Samira Idroos

New York City is notorious for its crowds. As far as American cities go, it is one of the most densely-populated spots in the country with about 30 people per square acre. But the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas is in a league of its own. Held on the 1,200-acre Las Vegas Motor Speedway, the electronic music festival brings in close to 150,000 people. That’s 125 people per square acre, meaning EDC is more than three times as crowded as Times Square on an average night. PLUR.